Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Getting drums to work
#1
I'm using Muse 2.1 on UbuntuStudio 12.10 with KXstudio. Card is UA-25ex.

I've tried creating songs with the synths included in the package, and tracks created with MIDI for, say, piano, work.

But drum tracks don't work even though I've tried a few things:

I've looked for manuals for SimpleDrums and can't find any. Googling for pictures I saw that in the fields I had to include WAV files, and did that. Now I hear a click but not the sounds. The WAV files sound good on their own.

I've tried creating a song with percussion, new drums, old drums -- in all cases I can fill some dots where the sounds should be, but I get no sound.

It's clear I'm a newbie regarding MIDI. Audio works just fine. Piano etc I get them to work. But not percussion, specifically. I've looked for tutorials and found none.

Please help?

Thanks!
Reply
#2
Also, I tried working with ZynAddSubFX and it did work, but then I exited Muse, and when I loaded the session again the link with the synth was lost.

That's why I'm trying to do all my work inside Muse. Pianos work well, but percussion -- haven't been able to find the way.

Thanks!
Reply
#3
Hello Lucasgsc,

Did you see the video tutorials on youtube? I'm not sure they exactly explain your issue but they give a decent background.
<!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://muse-sequencer.org/index.php/Tutorials">http://muse-sequencer.org/index.php/Tutorials</a><!-- m -->

I'll try to test the ZynAddSubFX scenario later on. I mostly run synths from within MusE but it should work just as well to configure it to use an external synth.

I think you are on the right track with adding samples to Simple Drums. Note that each sample will only play for one Note starting from C1 and going up.
So if you loaded a sample in the first position you need to use this note in the editor, this is the "A-note" in the Drum editors.
Also make sure the Enable checkbox at the top of each position in SimpleDrums is on, it should be set when you load a sample.

Also you could experiment with using the Pianoroll see if you can get it to play the samples. Drumtracks are a convenience for editing drums, behind the scenes it is pretty much the same thing as a normal midi track.

A third thing that might be good to know is there are many decent drumkits available as soundfonts, they can be loaded with the Fluidsynth synth.

See if that gets you closer and report back!

Regards,
Robert
Reply
#4
Hi. There are some docs for the synths installed in
usr/share/doc/muse-2.1 as well as other important READMEs.

I just tried SImpleDrums with the drum editor and I think I've found the problem.

You want to open the SimpleDrums GUI and click on the 'nOff' boxes so that the
samples do not respond to note-off messages.

Most drum devices, such as external hardware or a soundfont, make their own noises
which usually die away on their own and ignore any note-off messages sent to them.

Thus the 'length' of each drum note is usually irrelevant.
MusE drum notes by default are very short, but are adjustable.

So the problem was that the SimpleDrums samples were being cut off too soon
by the note-off messages sent by MusE.

Try those SimpleDrums 'nOff' boxes. Guaranteed it works.

Just to be sure, make sure the Drum Track's selected output device column points
to the SimpleSynth instance. Although you say you got short 'tick' noises so I'm sure you've
got this correct.

As a side note to Robert, maybe we should include an option to not send drum note-offs at all,
so that other kinds of devices (hardware etc.) might not suffer from this problem.
I think our Midi Filter and Tranformer dialogs support this already, in a roundabout sort of way.

Have fun.
Tim.
Reply
#5
Robert, looked at those videos and learned some other things. Thanks!

Tim, nOff just works, thanks!. Given that I'm using Kxstudio, I'll just have to fire Catia (a JACK front-end) first, and then just live within MusE. Reducing dependencies, or at least keeping them under control, will possibly help me to just "sit down and play".

Just a short story: I'm 50. I started recording multiple tracks when I was 14 (rewinding the tape in cassette player A, pressing play, and recording both the sound from cassette A and a new guitar track unto cassette player B) -- soon more noise than guitar. At age 24 I wrote an Apple IIe program, in assembler language (that's almost machine code), that would take keypresses on numbers and produce sound; once finished, it would produce a list of "note, duration" pairs. It's taken me this long to almost get to something useable with free software.

I'd like to help newbies go faster than I have. So, is there a way to contribute with tutorials, help with people who are looking at the interface to make them more useful for the newbies? Sometimes experts are too far ahead to even notice why the interface is needlessly hard. So if someone is at this kind of thing, here's an old newbie with some time to help. One thing I might consider helping with is start with some other documentation and slightly enhance its readability. <!-- s:-? --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_e_confused.gif" alt=":-?" title="Confused" /><!-- s:-? -->

"Plug and play" is coming! Yay!
Reply
#6
lucasgsc Wrote:Robert, looked at those videos and learned some other things. Thanks!

Just a short story: I'm 50. I started recording multiple tracks when I was 14 (rewinding the tape in cassette player A, pressing play, and recording both the sound from cassette A and a new guitar track unto cassette player B) -- soon more noise than guitar. At age 24 I wrote an Apple IIe program, in assembler language (that's almost machine code), that would take keypresses on numbers and produce sound; once finished, it would produce a list of "note, duration" pairs. It's taken me this long to almost get to something useable with free software.

I'd like to help newbies go faster than I have. So, is there a way to contribute with tutorials, help with people who are looking at the interface to make them more useful for the newbies? Sometimes experts are too far ahead to even notice why the interface is needlessly hard. So if someone is at this kind of thing, here's an old newbie with some time to help. One thing I might consider helping with is start with some other documentation and slightly enhance its readability. <!-- s:-? --><img src="{SMILIES_PATH}/icon_e_confused.gif" alt=":-?" title="Confused" /><!-- s:-? -->

"Plug and play" is coming! Yay!

Welcome to 1995!

About that cassette: Yeah I sure didn't have money for recording equipment when I was 18.
So I discovered that my single cassette deck could actually record sound-on-sound if I oh-so-carefully
pressed the record+play buttons down half-way only, so that the erase head did not contact the tape !
I still have those "multi-track" recordings right here. Drums, rhythm guitar, and lead guitar (no bass at the time).
Maybe I ought to upload them for fun!

Two other times in my life, partially plugging in input jacks to cassette records 'saved the party':
Once at a computer fair around 1980, I see this guy at a table with a COSMAC ELF (RCA 1802 CPU).
Well, my home computer was an RCA COSMAC VP, virtually the same computer.
So I introduced myself, sat down, and from memory typed in machine code for some replicas of then-video games'
sound effects, to be output from the cassette output jack of the computer.
The fellow must have been thinking, "what the... who is this guy?" And I'm like "don't worry this'll be cool, trust me".
So I finish the code, only to discover to my dismay that he has no sound amplifier, only a cassette recorder.
So after a few tense moments, I discovered by partially plugging in the jack to the cassette, it would NOT
cut off the incoming sound from the built-in speaker (they do that to prevent feedback).
So then we had sound. And the sound effects worked and folks started gathering around...

Another time a guy had a guitar but no amp, but a ghetto blaster with a cassette.
So we're like, "bummer, no sound!" So while everyone was out of the room I recalled that trick
and partially plugged in the jack and then we had sound. Yeah, let's rock!

About helping:
Pre-built documentation PDF and HTML manuals have finally just been added to MusE on Thursday.
I suppose you could:
A) Make some videos, those are always helpful.
B) Write some text files and we can incorporate them into the pre-built docs.
C) Get into the nuts and bolts by contributing directly to the documentation source file which
gets built into the finished documentation. This source file is called /doc/documentation.tex
and it is a LaTex file, so brush up on your latex commands! There is a script to generate the
documentation as well, because generating is a bit involved.

Thanks.
Tim.
Reply
#7
Cool stories about half-pressing buttons. Didn't know you could do that at all, Tim!

Can I have two instances of MusE? My current "2.1 svn 0", plus <!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="https://sourceforge.net/scm/?type=svn&group_id=93414">https://sourceforge.net/scm/?type=svn&group_id=93414</a><!-- m --> at the same time? I wouldn't want to break my current set up as I'm just getting used to it and learning a lot. I'd also, ahem, like to make some music.

Re documentation:
- At the very least, I can write my own story as a user: my set up and how to get up to some speed. I'll write something and see how it fits inside <!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://lmuse.svn.sourceforge.net/viewvc/lmuse/trunk/muse2/doc/pdf/documentation.pdf?view=log">http://lmuse.svn.sourceforge.net/viewvc ... f?view=log</a><!-- m --> I came here after watching this: <!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://decibelioslinuxeros.blogspot.com.es/2011/11/grabacion-de-una-demo-con-gnulinux.html">http://decibelioslinuxeros.blogspot.com ... linux.html</a><!-- m --> which is in Spanish, gave me some good hints, left some important bits out, and has information on how to do the video itself (audio about audio could be tricky).
- I'll try and change the language setting from Spanish ... ah: <!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://muse-sequencer.org/index.php/TranslateMusE">http://muse-sequencer.org/index.php/TranslateMusE</a><!-- m --> ... "muse -l en" works! Which means I might help with translation once the documentation is stable enough?

Thank you!
Reply
#8
lucasgsc Wrote:Can I have two instances of MusE? My current "2.1 svn 0", plus <!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="https://sourceforge.net/scm/?type=svn&group_id=93414">https://sourceforge.net/scm/?type=svn&group_id=93414</a><!-- m --> at the same time? I wouldn't want to break my current set up as I'm just getting used to it and learning a lot. I'd also, ahem, like to make some music.

It is possible but not recommended unless you're aware of what you're doing.
For example I have installed a pre-packaged MusE from my distro's repository,
obviously an older version, never use it actually but good for reference.
But at the same time I also work on, compile, and install the SVN versions.
Several local work-in-progress 'flavours' at the same time in fact.
Each and every different source-installed version, I tell to put in its own folder
in my home dir, NOT /usr/local or /usr.
So far so good, the'yre all separate and I can keep track of them.

But the main issue to be aware of is that they are all competing for the same,
single group of configuration files, found in ~/.config/MusE.
So as you switch back and forth between the versions you will get warnings about unknown
configuration strings and so on, not to mention the loss of said strings when you switch
over to the older version which didn't support those strings.

You can also run more than one instance of MusE, and each instance's Jack client name,
and I think ALSA client name as well, are unique (that's important) so they can talk
to each other failry easily by connecting ports and so on. With Jack it can be over
a network, too! That's why unique names are important, if Jack is being used we ask Jack
for a unique name, and Jack thankfully handles this for us quite well - even over a network.

Tim.
Reply
#9
Ah, yes, not just MusE, but JACK too. And I'm using kxstudio, so who knows if there are yet more interdependencies. (I won't even ask!)

So, thanks for the info, but I'll just play safe and keep my current 2.1. I'll finish off some other (important) work, then treat me to some MusE, and write that for others who are even more of a newbie than myself.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 2 Guest(s)